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Tenleytown's Woodrow Wilson High School exemplifies the high standard of architectural quality that characterized Washington's public school design and construction until the mid-twentieth century. The school was carefully designed to suit the unique…

Mary Church Terrell was born in Memphis, Tennessee on September 23, 1863. She earned her Bachelors and Masters degrees at Oberlin College during the 1880s, and taught in Ohio and Washington, DC. Following the completion of her graduate degree, Mary…

The Jesse Reno School was built in 1903 for African American children. Designed by municipal architect Snowden Ashford, the school had four rooms on the first floor and four on the basement level. Its formal Renaissance-style design acknowledges the…

When James and Mary Hurd bought 116 Bryant Street in 1944, neighbors sued. Neighbors also sued the Hurds’ real estate agent, Raphael Urciolo, who had subsequently sold three more houses on the block to African Americans. All four properties had…

African Americans began moving to the 100 block of Adams Street around 1925, despite covenants on some properties. At least nine houses on the block were the subject of lawsuits brought by white homeowners, who argued that the presence of black…

Clara Mays bought 2213 First Street in February 1944, after the house she had been renting was sold. Mays defied a racial covenant because she couldn’t find another place for her large household. Especially for black families, housing was in…

DC Historic Sites

DC Historic Sites is based on the DC Inventory of Historic Sites, the city's official list of properties deemed worthy of recognition and protection for their contribution to the cultural heritage of the city, the nation’s capital, and the nation. DC Historic Sites was developed by the DC Preservation League, Washington's only citywide nonprofit advocate dedicated to the preservation, protection and enhancement of the historic resources of our nation's capital. Read more About Us