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The Evans-Tibbs house is located at 1910 Vermont Avenue, N.W. near the northeast corner of the intersection of Vermont Avenue and Tenth Street, N.W. The house was constructed in 1894-1895 by Richard E. Crump. The structure's simplified Victorian…

The Belmont House is interesting as an example of sequential architectural development coincident with the growth and settlement of Washington, D.C.--from the vernacular colonial farmhouse, built for function rather than style, through the Georgian,…

William Syphax was born in 1825 to Charles Syphax and Maria Carter. Charles, Syphax’s father, was enslaved by a man named George Washington Parke Custis, grandson and adopted son of George and Martha Washington. Maria, Syphax’s mother, was also…

Tenleytown's Woodrow Wilson High School exemplifies the high standard of architectural quality that characterized Washington's public school design and construction until the mid-twentieth century. The school was carefully designed to suit the unique…

Mary Church Terrell was born in Memphis, Tennessee on September 23, 1863. She earned her Bachelors and Masters degrees at Oberlin College during the 1880s, and taught in Ohio and Washington, DC. Following the completion of her graduate degree, Mary…

The Jesse Reno School was built in 1903 for African American children. Designed by municipal architect Snowden Ashford, the school had four rooms on the first floor and four on the basement level. Its formal Renaissance-style design acknowledges the…

DC Historic Sites

DC Historic Sites is based on the DC Inventory of Historic Sites, the city's official list of properties deemed worthy of recognition and protection for their contribution to the cultural heritage of the city, the nation’s capital, and the nation. DC Historic Sites was developed by the DC Preservation League, Washington's only citywide nonprofit advocate dedicated to the preservation, protection and enhancement of the historic resources of our nation's capital. Read more About Us