The building as it now appears is the work of architect John Russell Pope. Although a few interior alterations have been made during the 47-year period since the house was converted from residential to business use, an effort has been made to…

Built-in 1824 for Dr. Joseph Lovell, first Surgeon General of the United States who organized the Army Corps of Engineers, this National Historic Landmark serves as the official guest house of the President of the United States. In 1836, Francis…

The historic district is bounded by North Capitol Street on the east, Harwood Road to the northeast, Rock Creek Church Road on the northwest, Park Place to the west, and Irving Street on the South. The Eagle Gate at the intersection of Rock Creek…

Brooks Mansion is located near the center of Square 3827, a flat, approximately i 3/4 acre site bounded by 9th, 10th, Monroe and Newton Streets, N.E. It is composed of the original Greek Revival mansion house, Bellair, built by Ann and Jehiel Brooks…

During the early twentieth century, the British government procured a large tract of land off of Massachusetts Avenue in order to establish their new embassy. The area was underdeveloped compared to other neighborhoods in the Washington DC area.…

The detached, stucco and limestone residence, in the 18th century Roman revival manner, is significant for its plan, spatial composition, and use of detail and material. The pie-shaped site faces across the west end of Sheridan Circle and the…

This memorial to Edmund Burke, English statesman who espoused the cause of the American colonies in Parliament, was presented to the United States by the Sulgrave Institution, This eight and a half foat high bronze portrait statue is a copy of a…

The Lunch Room Building and its associated Oyster Shucking Shed, built from 1916-1918 in conjunction with the construction of the Municipal Fish Market, are located at 1100 Maine Avenue, S.W., in Washington, D.C. in the area now known as the Maine…

The south-facing residence sits approximately forty feet from the street on a gently sloping lot. The overall form of the house is simple and orderly and distinguished by its shallow-pitched hipped roof with broad eaves. The exterior, which is of…

The James Ormond Wilson Teachers' College, originally known as the Washington Normal School, is a Elizabethan Revival brick building with two floors, an attic and basement. Erected from 1911-1912, the school sits on a 95,138 square foot site. The…