By the 1880s and 1890s, row house design on Capitol Hill exhibited the fashionable Queen Anne and Romanesque Revival styles, taking full advantage of the city’s Projection Act of 1871. Flat fronts gave way to projecting bays, towers, and porches…

An early speculative venture from the post-war period is Philadelphia Row, a row of attached houses in the 100 block of ll th Street, S.E. These houses which have Federal period stylistic elements were built by Capitol Hill developer James Gessford…

Congressional Cemetery is a tract of about thirty acres of ground on the north bank of the Anacostia River just northeast of Pennsylvania Avenue at Barney Circle, S. E. The main entrance to the cemetery is at 1801 E Street, S. E., at the…

The Commandant's House is situated at the north end of the parade ground, this impressive 2 1/2- story, white-painted, Flemish-bonded brick residence is the home of the Commandants of the U.S. Marine Corps, a function it has served continually since…

The row house at 219 11th Street SE, historically home to the Furies Collective, is a two-story, early 20th-century brick dwelling located in the Capitol Hill Historic District. The house is one of a pair of dwellings in a block of other 19th and…

Constructed sometime between 1802 and 1819 and designed by architects Nicholas King and Nicholas Hedges, the house is historically significant because of its association in the nineteenth century with one of the Federal City's most distinguished…

The Belmont House is interesting as an example of sequential architectural development coincident with the growth and settlement of Washington, D.C.--from the vernacular colonial farmhouse, built for function rather than style, through the Georgian,…

Saint Mark's Church was established as a mission in 1867 and its congregation has played an important role in the life of the Capitol Hill area. The red-brick, High Victorian church designed in 1888 by T. Buckler Chequier combines Romanesque elements…

Built in 1865-66, this 50-bed hospital was intended to serve Civil War naval forces on the Potomac, and remained in hospital use until 1911. It was probably built on the site of an earlier hospital. From 1920 to 1963, it served as the Temporary…

This imposing brick and stone streetcar barn was constructed in 1891 (Walter C. Root, architect) at a terminus of the city’s first and perhaps most important streetcar line, running along Pennsylvania Avenue from Georgetown to the Navy Yard. The…