The 3-acre Kalorama Park contains the Kalorama Playground Archaeological Site, also known as the John Little House. The site represents the remains of John Little’s home and farm and is the place from which slave Hortense Prout attempted escape…

Andrew Jackson Downing, designer of a romantic vision of the National Mall (not implemented) and the most romantic figure of nineteenth-century American design, wrote in 1850 of the need for truth in domestic architecture, that a country home reflect…

The Main Gate serves as the entrance to the Marine Corps Historic District. The U.S. Marine Corps Barracks and Commandant's House comprise the Nation's oldest continually active Marine Corps installation. Situated in southeast Washington, the post…

Washington Bowie, merchant, real estate speculator, church vestryman, officer of the militia bank, director and one of Georgetown's wealthiest men in the first decades of the 19th century, built for himself and his large family a suitably monumental…

These villas are of brick and are to be painted some warm mellow tint and sanded. The walls are open, with a 3-inch air space from the bottom of the cellar to their tops, thus securing a dry house in wet weather, and warm one in cold weather and cool…

The leader believed that "all forms of labor, whether with head or hand, are honorable" and Armstrong is the preeminent example of this educational movement in Washington, D.C. Armstrong is part of the cluster of traditionally black schools located…

A federal period house, with a unique, early twentieth century first floor plan, the Bodisco House is included in virtually every book on Georgetown because of the mid-nineteenth century romance and marriage of its fifty-four year old owner, the…

It was one of the few buildings spared during urban renewal clearance in southwest in the late 1950's and early 1960's. At that time the houses attached to the east and west sides of the Lewis House were demolished. Today the early nineteenth century…

Holy Trinity Church was established in 1787 at which is now 3513 N Street NW. It was originally called "Georgetown Chapel" because of the uncertainty of the laws against erecting Catholic churches. It was founded by Archbishop John Carroll, the first…

The Haw House was built in 1816-1817, and, like its next door neighbor at 2806, it reflects the typical Georgetown style of building. The facade is three bays wide with red brick laid in Flemish bond. It has a vertical emphasis which results from the…