Perhaps no Southwest resident is more emblematic of this dream of social and economic ascension than James C. Dent. Born into slavery in 1855, Dent grew up a farm laborer in the tobacco country of southern Maryland. Dent eventually made his way to…

Traditionally the house is said to have been built by Washington Lewis, George Washington's nephew. A deed search and a review of assessment re cords yield no evidence to verify ownership by Washington Lewis. In 1830 a neighboring lot was assessed to…

Channel Square is also one of the very few apartment buildings in DC by noted architect, Harry Weese. Though he was trained under and appreciated the Modernist approach, Weese is often considered one of the first postmodern architects, which can be…

Capitol Park Towers was the first and largest residential complex in the Southwest area and fashioned as a model planning project whose innovative combination of high-rise and low-rise buildings, arranged around a network of landscaped courts and…

The buildings stand tallest at the west end, where the complex opens in a U shape to maximize views of the river, and they drop to three stories near 4th Street where they embrace and incorporate three historic landmarks: Wheat Row (1793), the…

The twin nine-story buildings designed by Pei face each other across a landscaped yard. The complex is mirrored by Town Center West on the opposite side of the original retail center. The buildings are significant as one of Pei’s first forays…

The east face of the pedestal incorporates the year of dedication (1931) and the sculptor's name. The rear features the following inscription: To the young and the old The rich and the poor The ignorant and the learned All Who gave their…

The Duncanson-Cranch House at 468-470 N Street, S.W., was constructed about 1794. It has vernacular characteristics typical of early Washington domestic architecture. Noteworthy characteristics include the second story recessed arches of the main…