The low, neoclassical bridge is 2,163 feet long and 90 feet between balustrades, carrying a 60- foot-wide roadway and 15-foot sidewalks. Nine broad arches cross the river; roadways pass through additional segmental-arched openings at either end.…

Built-in 1824 for Dr. Joseph Lovell, first Surgeon General of the United States who organized the Army Corps of Engineers, this National Historic Landmark serves as the official guest house of the President of the United States. In 1836, Francis…

Built to house the international exhibits left over from the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition of 1876, it reflects the three principal requirements of this architectural type: to enclose a very large area, to present a tasteful, dramatic, and…

The elaborate tiered cast iron fountain by Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, sculptor of the Statue of Liberty, has graced the grounds of the Botanic Garden since 1878. It was purchased by the federal government for $6,000 after being exhibited to great…

Built in 1765 in the British colony of Maryland, the house was already 59 years old when the British invaded Washington, D.C. in 1814. Although it is preserved for its architecture today, it was originally preserved through a case of mistaken…

The monument to pioneer Methodist bishop Francis Asbury (1745-1810) was erected on a small triangular reservation in 1924. The bronze figure on a granite pedestal depicts Asbury astride a pausing horse. Asbury was the first superintendent of the…

Built in 1878-1880, the Auditor's Building is the first facility designed and constructed for the U.S. Department of the Treasury Bureau of Engraving and Printing by the Federal Government. This complex housed the necessary materials for the…

Battleground National Cemetery is significant for its association with the only military engagement ever fought in the District of Columbia. It is the District's only national cemetery for Civil War casualties, and it is the Nation's smallest…

This twelve-room schoolhouse, the sister of Gales School, typifies the city’s post-Civil War red brick public schools, and is one of the last such buildings downtown. The building shows how mass-production technology influenced the design of civic…

Though the eminent nineteenth-century American architect Robert Mills conceived the initial design, the structure also reflects the technical knowledge and aesthetic judgment of Thomas Lincoln Casey, the Arm Corps engineer charged with completing the…