Seventh Street, NW, East Side of 1000 Block

1005, 1009, 1011, 1013, 1015, 1015‑1/2, 1017, 1019, 1021, 1023, 1025, 1027‑31, 1033, and 1035 7th Street, NW; 649 and 651 New York Avenue, NW

The 1000 block of Seventh Street, N.W. developed as commercial activity moved northward on Seventh Street, spurred by the construction of the Seventh Street streetcar line in 1863. Nine of the thirteen buildings now standing on that block were constructed during the 1870's. Of particular significance is the fact that the block has remained very much intact in its one hundred years of existence, despite--or perhaps because of--the area's decline as a commercial center. The buildings which comprise the block form a cohesive unit of nineteenth century commercial design. The two major exceptions, one building constructed in 1914 and another in 1938, generally conform in height and materials and do not detract greatly from the overall integrity of the block.

The first proprietors of businesses on the 1000 block of Seventh Street were nearly all merchants of German descent. In response to the rapidly growing city, their businesses ranged from furniture to paint to hardware stores, as well as cigar, liquor, and saddlery stores that served the neighborhood. Seventh Street grew as a commercial center thanks to the development of its streetcar line which ran from Florida Avenue down to the waterfront. The streetcar line had the effect of spurring commercial development northward on Seventh Street. In keeping with the northward movement of development, the block between New York Avenue and L Street was almost entirely developed during the decade of the 1870's.

DC Inventory: November 21, 1978
National Register: February 2, 1984

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1005, 1009, 1011, 1013, 1015, 1015‑1/2, 1017, 1019, 1021, 1023, 1025, 1027‑31, 1033, and 1035 7th Street, NW; 649 and 651 New York Avenue, NW