Langston Terrace Dwellings opened in 1938 as one of the nation’s earliest federally funded public housing projects for lower income residents and only the second one to be built for African Americans. Planned during the Depression, with its housing…

The Washington Urban League (WUL) was established in 1938 as the local arm of the National Urban League with Black economic empowerment as its focus. From its establishment through the height of the Civil Rights Movement, in the 1960's, WUL fought…

As uniformed, teenage workers for Pride, Inc. completed cleanup projects in the fall of 1967 and moved on to the next job, they slapped stickers with these words all over the Cardozo-Shaw neighborhood. Organized by future D.C. Mayor Marion Barry,…

Founded in 1958, the Neighbors Inc. set as its primary mission the persuasion of white homeowners to remain in the city. To do that, Neighbors, Inc. doggedly documented racist tactics that realtors used to stimulate the real estate market and further…

In February 1944 a federal employee named Clara Mays purchased the house at 2213 First Street NW in the Bloomingdale neighborhood. Despite warnings she’d be taking a risk in buying the house because a racial covenant barred its sale to African…

In 1939, Lincoln Temple Congregational Church was the site of a mass meeting to "Abolish Modern Slavery," hosted by the National Negro Congress (NNC). With a goal of focusing attention on police enforcement of racial terrorism, the meeting's speakers…

In 1913 laborer and entrepreneur John Whitelaw Lewis founded the Industrial Savings Bank at 11th and U streets NW, opening up financial opportunities for blacks.  When it opened, Industrial Bank (designed by black architect Isaah T. Hatton) was the…

George E.C. Hayes (1894-1968) graduated from the Howard University Law School in 1918 and spent much of the rest of his life working to dismantle racial segregation. Hayes taught law at Howard and served as the university’s general counsel for more…