Arthur Ashe, who wrote this passage, was among the many luminaries who headed to this area—a center for black business, activism and entertainment since the turn of the 20th century—when he came to town for tennis tournaments in the early 1960s. U…

In 1874, as D.C.'s African American population and political clout grew during Reconstruction (1865-1877), Congress stripped D.C. residents of the ability to elect their own mayor and city council, denying them the right of self-governance. For the…

The Washington Urban League (WUL) was established in 1938 as the local arm of the National Urban League with Black economic empowerment as its focus. From its establishment through the height of the Civil Rights Movement, in the 1960's, WUL fought…

Over the course of four transformative decades, Vermont Avenue Baptist Church was a hub for civil rights organizing in the District of Columbia. Under the 40-year leadership of Reverend C.T. Murray beginning in 1929, the church also expanded its…

In 1948, a local chapter of the Young Progressives of America—an anti-segregationist organization—and black neighborhood residents joined together to demand entry to Rosedale’s pool and recreation center. The racially mixed group picketed the…