Civil Rights Site: Civic and Social Life - The Clubhouse

The ClubHouse (also known as the Clubhouse and the Club House), constructed in phases between 1930 and 1945, served as an automobile garage and showroom before becoming DC’s top African American dance club from 1975 to 1990. As AIDS became an…

Civil Rights Tour: Recreation - Uline Arena and E.B. Henderson

Uline Arena became the largest venue in the city for sports events when it opened in 1941, but its whites-only policy in an increasingly black city, and in a neighborhood where many African Americans lived, made it a source of controversy and a site…

Civil Rights Tour: Employment - Non-Partisan Council

In 1938, the National Non-partisan Council on Public Affairs (NPC), an outgrowth of the Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA) sorority, became the first organization devoted to lobbying the federal government to advance African American civil rights. The group…

Civil Rights Tour: Recreation - Seafarers Yacht Club

Lewis T. Green, Sr., a gifted wood carver, lover of waterways, and vocational arts teacher in the DC Public Schools, built boats as a hobby. In his search for a place to dock one of his vessels—a 49-foot cruiser named Valeria—Green contacted the US…

Civil Rights Tour: Recreation - Rosedale Playground

In 1948, a local chapter of the Young Progressives of America—an anti-segregationist organization—organized with black neighborhood residents to demand entry to Rosedale’s pool and recreation center. The racially mixed group picketed the facility…

Civil Rights Tour: Recreation - Rose Park Playground

Originally established in 1918 by the Ancient Order of the Sons and Daughters of Moses to serve African American children, Rose Park was known variously as Patterson’s Park, Jacob’s Park, or Winship’s Lot. The city acquired it in 1922 and designated…