Built in 1912 as the University Club, this building is now more closely associated with the legendary union leader John L. Lewis (1880-1969). A self-made man, Lewis was president of the United Mine Workers of America for more than forty years. In…

Designed by architect John J. Zink, K-B Theatres opened the Senator Theatre on February 19, 1942 with 946 available seats. The first film shown in the communal space was Alfred Hitchcock’s “Suspicion." The auditorium had large murals with classical…

Myrtilla Miner (1815-1864), a pioneer for Black female education, established the “Normal School for Colored Girls,” also known as the “Miner School for Girls” in 1851; its eventual large, three-story, symmetrically-massed Colonial Revival brick…

The Forrest-Marbury House is the District's only building whose documented history is intertwined with the founding of the national capital. It was in this house that George Washington dined with the District Commissioners and others on the day in…

The Columbia Hospital for Women, originally opened in 1866 as a healthcare facility for wives and widows of Civil War soldiers, was the city's birthplace of choice for all races for a century and a half. The hospital was the primary maternity…

At a time of Jim Crow ideology and enforced segregation, Carter G. Woodson (1875-1950) pioneered the documentation of African American life and the recognition of African American contributions to US history. Born to enslaved parents, Woodson was…