The Sewall–Belmont House, now the site of the Belmont–Paul Women's Equality National Monument, is famous for serving as the headquarters for the National Woman's Party from 1929 for nearly 90 years. Originally founded by Alice Paul and Lucy Burns to…

Erected in 1911 by the Samuel J. Prescott Company to a design by prominent Washington architect Appleton P. Clark, Jr., the Civil Service Commission building exemplifies the early-20th century office buildings developed privately for long-term use…

Built between 1882 and 1887, the Pension Building now houses the National Building Museum and is significant for both its architecture and place in the nation’s history. The Pension Building was designed by Army Quartermaster General Montgomery C.…

This was the first building constructed according to plans developed during the 1920s for a civic center between Judiciary Square and Pennsylvania Avenue. The building was designed by municipal architect Nathan C. Wyeth and constructed with the aid…

Designed and built by John J. Earley in 1907, this building is one of two artists’ workspaces on the block, the other being the adjacent Augustus Bussard House and Studio (1916) at 2129 G Street, NW. The Earley Office and Studio is located mid-block…

The Second National Bank stands among a group of banks in the vicinity of the Treasury Department that contribute to DC's financial district. It is one of the last of the classically inspired structures, built during a sustained boom in Washington…

Ford's Theatre is best known as the site of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865 by John Wilkes Booth, a Confederate sympathizer and actor. Originally named Ford's New Theatre, Ford's was built by Baltimore theater entrepreneur…