National Historic Landmarks of Sheridan-Kalorama & Dupont Circle

Have you ever wondered about the residents of the beautiful homes in Sheridan-Kalorama and Dupont Circle? In this tour of Washington, D.C.’s National Historic Landmarks (NHLs), you can learn about Andrew W. Mellon’s apartment building, famed ornithologist Elliot Coues, and the house President Woodrow Wilson moved into after he left the White House. All of the sites on this tour have been deemed notable in the course of American history, due to important individuals, events, or organizations. Additionally, each of the sites on this tour provide a glimpse into human components of the built environment, and show the intimate nature of homes, apartment buildings, and private space. Consider how these sites connect to the story of America, and what nationally-significant sites along the way may be missing. This tour can be completed by walking, public transport, or car. It is advised to map out your route to determine distance before beginning.

NHLs are ultimately designated by the Secretary of the Interior, upon the recommendation of the National Park System Advisory Board, and are evaluated based on their history, integrity of the property, and their value to the broader American historical narrative. There are currently around 2,600 NHLs, with 75 in the District alone.

Elliott Coues House

Although this semi-detached row house, likely built in the 1880s, is of no architectural significance itself, it achieved landmark status for its association with Dr. Elliott Coues. Born in New Hampshire in 1842, Coues moved to DC with his family in…

General Federation of Women’s Clubs Headquarters

This house at 1734 N Street, NW is located on a quiet residential street near Dupont Circle, an area developed by wealthy Washingtonians in the 1870s as they constructed opulent living spaces. Although most of the buildings are now used as offices,…

McCormick Apartments

The McCormick Apartments is a landmark apartment building on Embassy Row whose inhabitants once included Andrew W. Mellon. It consists of four stories, a mansard, and a raised basement. The top-floor apartment commemorates Andrew Mellon's national…

Larz Anderson House (Society of the Cincinnati)

Built for diplomat Larz Anderson and his wife Isabel Weld Perkins Anderson, an author, philanthropist, and heiress to a trading fortune, the Anderson House also served as the temporary residence of many visiting dignitaries.Anderson himself was a…

Charles Evans Hughes House (Chancery of Burma)

Built in 1907 for A. Clifford and Alice Pike Barney by George Oakley Totten, this house is most notable as the home of Charles Evans Hughes—a statesman and juror of the highest order, a leader in the Progressive movement, and the holder of a…

Woodrow Wilson House

The Woodrow Wilson House is a three-story red brick building, originally built for Henry Parker Fairbanks by architect Waddy B. Wood in 1915. Located in the Embassy Row section of Northwest Washington, the house was designed in the Georgian Revival…

Frances Perkins House

Located on a quiet residential street, this 1914 Colonial Revival townhouse is typical of the finely detailed urban residential building constructed in the Sheridan-Kalorama neighborhood of Washington, D.C. in the early twentieth century. Frances…

Windsor Lodge (William E. Borah Residence)

Originally known as Windsor Lodge, this building was erected in 1910-11. Two years later, U.S. Senator William E. Borah of Idaho moved into apartment number 21E, where he continued living until 1929. Borah was one of the most influential figures in…