Designed by local D.C. architect Joseph G. Herbert, the Valencia Apartments are representative of interwar urban development in the 1930s. The conventional, low-rise apartment building stands at three stories in an irregular U-shape. The structure…

Designed by local D.C. architect Louis T. Rouleau, these two buildings reflect the development of residential units on New Hampshire Avenue following World War I. Modest in appearance and created for the rental market, The Hampshire reflects…

Designed as a luxurious apartment home with a café, spacious parlors, dining rooms, and retail space on the ground floor, the Kenesaw initially housed members of Congress and wealthy Washingtonians in the early 20th century. By the 1960s, a…

The Glenn Arms apartment building was constructed in 1916 by J.E. Fox for owner and architect George N. Bell (of the firm Hunter & Bell). It was not known by a name until it and its next-door neighbor, the Fulford, came into common ownership and…

The Fulford was constructed in 1911 and named upon its completion. Its architect was Carroll Beale (1882-1942), a self-employed civil engineer, residential builder and innovator in concrete construction. The four-story brick building has an Italian…

Up until the early twentieth century, the Brightwood area was mostly rural. In the 1820s, Brightwood contained important transportation routes until the road network changed during the Civil War for a line of defensive fortifications. Eventually,…

Constructed in 1899, The Jefferson apartment building is one of 105 multiple-family dwellings built in DC between 1880 and 1900, of which only thirteen remain. This four-story structure contains eight apartments, two units on each floor; it also has…

The Roosevelt makes a significant contribution to the understanding of the development of the apartment building. Approval for the Roosevelt was granted on October 17, 1898 with the issuance of D.C. Permit to Build #625. The architect was C. Graham…

Built in 1902-1903, the Ethelhurst was one of the earliest multi-story apartment buildings in Washington and is historically notable as a product of T. Franklin Schneider, an architect and entrepreneur who pioneered luxury multi-story apartment…

The three-story structure was completed while the neighborhood was transitioning from a wealthy suburban enclave to an area of moderately priced row houses and apartment buildings. The modestly appointed building would have appealed to middle income…