The Brodhead-Bell-Morton mansion just northeast of Scott Circle is architecturally significant for its grand Beaux Arts style. It speaks to a time — the turn of the 20th century — when Massachusetts Avenue NW, 16th Street, and the nearby Dupont…

The Real Estate Trust building stands out among DC’s early-twentieth century office buildings. The building is a steel and concrete frame structure, sheathed in ivory-colored terra cotta with poly chrome accents. Its ground floor is clad in white…

The Bond Building has been a pivotal structure in downtown DC’'s business and financial district since it was constructed in 1901. The seven-story Beaux Arts office building, designed by architect George S. Cooper (1864-1929), stands as a landmark…

Designed by noted local architect Jules Henri de Sibour (1872-1938), the Beaux Arts Hamilton Hotel opened in 1922. The eleven-story limestone and terra cotta building offered out-of-town guests and locals meeting rooms, a gracious dining room, and a…

The Congressional Club is a distinctive classical building with a prominent domed rotunda at the corner of Sixteenth Street and New Hampshire Avenue. Designed by architect George Oakley Totten Jr. (1866-1939), the 1914 building exemplifies the…

Walter Reed General Hospital is one of the oldest operating Army general hospitals, and has played an important role in medical advancements throughout its history. Since 1924, it has been associated with medical education as the site of the Walter…

One of the first great union terminals, this imperial station with its vast interior spaces was the cornerstone of the McMillan Commission’s efforts to revive Pierre L’Enfant’s original plan of the city. Following the 1901 McMillan Commission, its…

When the seat of the federal government moved to DC in 1800, no provision was made for housing for the Supreme Court—a problem that wouldn’t be permanently resolved for 135 years.Less than two weeks before the Court was to convene for the first time…

Built in 1910 from designs by architects Nathan C. Wyeth (1870-1963) and Francis P. Sullivan (1882-1929), the Pullman House was the property of Hattie Sanger, the widow of the sleeping car magnate; however, it is said she never occupied the French…

Erected in 1912, the Riggs or Albee Building and the adjoining theater were built on a site formerly occupied by the Riggs House, a large hotel demolished in 1911. Originally, the building was known as the Riggs Building, and the adjoining theater…