Brodhead-Bell-Morton Residence

This Beaux Arts-style mansion is a reminder of early-twentieth century DC high society.

The Brodhead-Bell-Morton mansion is significant both for its architecture and for its role in the history of Washington during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The building is an example of the Beaux Arts style, and as a contributor to the character of its Scott Circle and Embassy Row neighborhood. Originally a fine example of the romantic Victorian period, the mansion was transformed by John Russell Pope (1874-1937) in 1912 into its present form. Few traces of the work of the original architect, John Fraser (1825-1906), are still visible.

Pope's redesign is a fine example of the Beaux Arts school of architecture that flourished in Washington briefly around the turn of the century. It remains the only surviving residential example adjacent to Scott Circle. Pope's redesign is a fine example of the Beaux Arts school of architecture that flourished in Washington high society briefly around the turn of the century. It remains the only surviving residential example adjacent to Scott Circle.

DC Inventory: November 8, 1964
National Register: October 14, 1987

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1500 Rhode Island Avenue NW