President’s Park South constituted a signal piece of L’Enfant’s early city plan for Washington, and was acquired by the Federal Government in the 1790s. L’Enfant initially envisioned a large, 80-acre landscaped area upon which the Executive Mansion…

Built between 1882 and 1887, the Pension Building now houses the National Building Museum and is significant for both its architecture and place in the nation’s history. The Pension Building was designed by Army Quartermaster General Montgomery C.…

Designed by notable yacht designer John Trumpy, the Sequoia is a 104-foot long wooden boat with a single mast. Nine presidents utilized the Sequoia between 1931 and 1977. The yacht provided a space for social and recreational activity (such as John…

Built in 1828, this home served as Benjamin Ogle Tayloe's residence and a social, intellectual, and cultural center for the political elite. Described as a "salon" for scholarly discourse and a space for high-society gatherings, the Federal-style…

Authorized in 1937, it was not built until 1943-44, when it was considered an important transportation route to a major military airfield. Suitland Parkway exemplifies the type of defense highway advocated by Franklin Roosevelt, and it is also…

Due to its close proximity to the White House, Saint John’s Church is known as the “Church of the Presidents”; accordingly, every President since James Madison has attended at least one service there. A prayer book in one of the pews contains the…

The original four and one-half acre tract of Congressional Cemetery was purchased from the Government for $200 on April 4, 1807 as a private burial ground. On March 30, 1812, several years after Christ Church was built, Ingle, one of the buyers,…

The Woodrow Wilson House is a three-story red brick building, originally built for Henry Parker Fairbanks by architect Waddy B. Wood in 1915. Located in the Embassy Row section of Northwest Washington, the house was designed in the Georgian Revival…