National Historic Landmarks: Capitol Hill

Capitol Hill is well-known as the neighborhood of Speakers of the House, United States Senators, and Supreme Court Justices. Its long and varied history has contributed to its designation as a historic district, and has enabled numerous properties to become nationally-recognized landmarks.

This tour is a collection of National Historic Landmarks (NHLs) in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington, D.C., From Navy Yard to the Supreme Court, this tour explores historic properties with national significance. Consider how these sites connect to the story of America, and what nationally-significant sites along the way may be missing. This tour can be completed by walking, public transport, or car. It is advised to map out your route to determine distance before beginning.

NHLs are ultimately designated by the Secretary of the Interior, upon the recommendation of the National Park System Advisory Board, and are evaluated based on their history, integrity of the property, and their value to the broader American historical narrative. There are currently around 2,600 NHLs, with 75 in the District alone.

Sewall-Belmont House (National Woman's Party Headquarters)

The Sewall–Belmont House, now the site of the Belmont–Paul Women's Equality National Monument, is famous for serving as the headquarters for the National Woman's Party from 1929 for nearly 90 years. Originally founded by Alice Paul and Lucy Burns to…

Mountjoy Bayly House

The Mountjoy Bayly House (also known as the Bayly House, Hiram W. Johnson House, Chaplains Memorial Building, and Parkington) was built in 1822 for the second Sergeant at Arms of the Senate, General Mountjoy Bayly. A combination of Federal and Second…

Supreme Court Building

When the seat of the federal government moved to DC in 1800, no provision was made for housing for the Supreme Court—a problem that wouldn’t be permanently resolved for 135 years.Less than two weeks before the Court was to convene for the first time…

The United States Capitol

The Capitol is both the seat of government and the symbol of the United States. It has been occupied continuously by Congress since 1800 (excepting one brief interruption), and until 1935 it housed the Supreme Court as well.The east and west fronts…

Library of Congress

Founded in 1880, the original Library of Congress collection included 740 books and three maps. This collection lived in the Capitol until 1814, when invading British troops burned the Capitol and destroyed the library inside it. Former President…

Marine Corps Commandant's House

Designed by Geroge Hadfield (1763-1926), the Marine Corps Commandant’s House is the only original building on the complex. This white-painted, Flemish-bonded brick residence has served as the home of the Commandants of the U.S. Marine Corps since its…

Washington Navy Yard Historic District

The nation's first naval yard and first home port began development in 1799 and eventually became the center for naval operations during a critical period of expanding nationalism in the early 19th century. From about 1850 onward, the Navy Yard was…

Congressional Cemetery Historic District

The original four and one-half acre tract of Congressional Cemetery was purchased from the Government for $200 on April 4, 1807 as a private burial ground. On March 30, 1812, several years after Christ Church was built, Ingle, one of the buyers,…