Historic Landmarks on the 2022 Most Endangered Places List

The 2022 Most Endangered Places list (and Watch List) includes a total of 24 properties. Some may be surprised to learn that many of these threatened properties are designated historic landmarks. This illustrates the important point that designation is sometimes the starting point for protecting a property. Additionally, all properties, whether landmarked or not, require continued attention and maintenance.

This tour includes the 11 historic landmarks found on this year's list. Three additional properties — Foundry Branch Trolley Trestle, Superintendent’s House at Dalecarlia Reservoir, and Watchman's Lodge and Tower — receive some level of protection, due to their location within larger designated areas.* However, they are not individually landmarked, and are not part of this tour.

For the full list of Most Endangered Places, please go to: dcpreservation.org/endangered-places/

*Foundry Branch Trolley Trestle is within Glover-Archbold Park, Superintendent’s House is associated with Washington Aqueduct, and Watchman's Lodge and Tower is within Fort Circle Parks Historic District.

Library of Congress (Jefferson Building)

Founded in 1880, the original Library of Congress collection included 740 books and three maps. This collection lived in the Capitol until 1814, when invading British troops burned the Capitol and destroyed the library inside it. Former President…

Anne Archbold Hall (Gallinger Hospital Nurses’ Residence)

Anne Archbold Hall was built in 1931-32 as the Nurses’ Residence of the Gallinger Municipal Hospital (later, Gallinger Memorial and ultimately D.C. General Hospital), which was a major teaching institution for the instruction of nurses.As home of the…

Woodlawn Cemetery

Woodlawn Cemetery is situated on a gently sloping plateau and is defined by hills, winding avenues, and diverse vegetation, as well as the panoramic views it offers of the District of Columbia's metropolitan area. Douglass Avenue, the main roadway,…

Alexander Crummell School

The Alexander Crummell School, built between 1910 and 1911, is located in Ivy City. Municipal Architect Snowden Ashford designed the building in 1910 in a personalized Renaissance style, and construction was carried out the following year by Allan T.…

District of Columbia Recorder of Deeds (and Interiors)

The District of Columbia Government’s Recorder of Deeds (ROD) Building expresses the interplay between political aspirations, social struggle, the search for civic identity, and even the influence of global war on the District of Columbia.Designed…

Washington Railway and Electric Company (WRECO) Garage

The Washington Railway and Electric Company (WRECO) Garage contributed to the development of mass transit systems in the District and surrounding commercial development of the area around the intersections of Seventh Street, U Street, Georgia Avenue,…

General Baking Company Bakery (Bond Bread Factory)

The General Baking Company's Bond Bread Factory is an Art Deco-style industrial building. Constructed in 1929 to the designs of architect Corry B. Comstock, the building's style, quality craftsmanship, and decorative detailing are rare for the city's…

First African New Church (Church of the New Jerusalem)

By 1846, a Swedenborgian, or New Church, congregation was fully established in Washington, and by 1858, the congregation had built a church just north of the Capitol. After that structure burned in 1889, the church built both a national church on…

Jackson Hill (Holt House)

Over the years, Holt House has come to be associated with Presidents John Quincy Adams, Andrew Jackson, and Martin Van Buren, but no substantial evidence has been uncovered to support these claims. Since 1891, it has served as the administrative…

Washington Canoe Club

The Washington Canoe Club, constructed in 1905 for the newly founded club of the same name, is an excellent example of shingle style architecture. The two-story frame building faces south onto the Potomac River and is designed to be seen from the…