DCPL-Sponsored Landmarks and Historic Districts

As Washington, DC’s citywide historic preservation nonprofit, DCPL has nominated a variety of historic landmarks and districts over the past five-decades in an effort to preserve, protect, and enhance the historic and built environment of the city. From restaurants and houses to office buildings and historic districts, DCPL has strived to ensure the preservation and promotion of DC’s history through its physical landmarks.

In 1971, the Old Post Office on Pennsylvania Avenue NW, a magnificent Richardsonian Romanesque-style building, was slated for demolition, with only its tower to be retained. Alison Owings, a news-writer and producer for WRC TV (an NBC affiliate), was distressed at the steady destruction of many of Washington’s historic buildings. Encouraged by Washington Post architecture critic Wolf Von Eckardt, Owings decided that a Washington advocacy group was needed, and she came up with a catchy name, “Don’t Tear It Down”. Early on, Owings joined forces with Terry B. Morton of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, whose work had led her to conclude that Washington needed a preservation-specific advocacy group. From here, “Don’t Tear It Down” expanded and continued to fight for the preservation of DC’s historic buildings and districts.

Over the last 50 years, DCPL has sponsored more than 160 historic landmark nominations, and engaged in hard-fought battles for numerous buildings, structures, and districts across Washington. In recent years, DCPL’s landmark nomination efforts have reflected a diverse assortment of building types and sites with cultural importance to a wide variety of groups. Some recent landmarks include the Nixon-Mounsey House, Annie’s Paramount Steakhouse, Slowe-Burrill House, the Furies Collective, and Uptown Theater. Additionally, as the historic preservation movement has matured, it has become an accepted element of local, state, and federal public policy.

DCPL has worked tirelessly to preserve Washington’s sense of place and to save many of the unique features that define the capital city’s history, architecture, and culture. Washington’s historic character is one of its greatest assets and a vital component of local culture, and economic growth and prosperity. DCPL continues to make an inestimable contribution to the protection and understanding of the history of the District of Columbia.

The historic sites featured in this inventory follow a reverse chronological order, with the most recent designation listed first, and so on. If you’d like to begin with the first DCPL-sponsored landmarks, stretching back to the early 1970s, please scroll down to the bottom of the inventory and work upward.

Note: This introduction and the sites included in this tour have been adapted from our 50th Anniversary Celebration Program. This event took place on May 20, 2022 at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library.

Uptown Theater

The Uptown Theater is prominently located along Connecticut Avenue NW in the Cleveland Park Historic District. Designed by John J. Zink – a notable and prolific movie theater architect from Baltimore – the theater’s Art Deco/Moderne design is…

Nixon-Mounsey House

Designed by William D. Nixon, a self-taught African American architect who was also a social and civil rights activist in DC, this private residence is a notable Art Deco style building in the Palisades neighborhood. The home is significant for both…

National Geographic Society Headquarters

Founded in 1888 by a group of high-level scholars, scientists, and adventurers, the National Geographic Society (NGS) has become a well-recognized scholastic and journalistic source for stories, maps, and photographs about science, exploration, and…

Buzzard Point Power Plant

Designed and built by the prominent construction firm Stone & Webster, the Buzzard Point Power Plant stands as an emblem of technological and artistic advancement in Southwest Washington. While various individuals owned the property and attempted…

Lucy Diggs Slowe Elementary School

The Lucy Diggs Slowe Elementary School first opened in 1945 in response to a lawsuit against segregated schooling in DC. John Preston Davis attempted to enroll his five-year old son at Noyes Elementary School in 1944, yet was rejected based upon…

Bazelon-McGovern House

Located in the Palisades neighborhood of Washington, DC, the Bazelon-McGovern House stands as a significant example of Japanese architecture in the District. The home was so unique that only a few weeks after the original family moved into the space…

Anacostia Historic District

Initially incorporated under the name Union Town, Anacostia began as a working-class community removed from the city and dominated by Navy Yard employees. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, the Union Land Association controlled the…

Slowe-Burrill House

This cross-gabled Queen Anne frame house at 1256 Kearny Street was built for prosperous Irish immigrant James T. and Hannah Ward. The house was probably completed in 1893, and the couple remained there until selling the property in 1918 to bookkeeper…

Annie's Paramount Steakhouse

Initially opened as a “musty little beer joint” in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, DC, Paramount Steakhouse (later renamed Annie’s Paramount Steakhouse)) became a haven for the LGBTQ+ community, almost entirely by accident. George…

INTELSAT Headquarter Building

Designed by architect John Hamilton Andrews, the INTELSAT office building is a distinctly Modernist  complex, identifiable through its glass and metallic silver finishes, modular and segmented design, and irregular, octagonal collection of office…

District of Columbia Recorder of Deeds (and Interiors)

The District of Columbia Government’s Recorder of Deeds (ROD) Building expresses the interplay between political aspirations, social struggle, the search for civic identity, and even the influence of global war on the District of Columbia.Designed…

Capital Traction Company Union Station

Located in the Georgetown Historic District in Northwest Washington, the Capital Traction Company Union Station (Capital Traction) property includes the central structure (also referred to as the Georgetown Car Barn), the adjacent stone retaining…

American Theater (Sylvan Theater)

For over 100 years, the American Theater (also known more commonly as the Sylvan Theater) operated as an entertainment hub and community anchor in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of DC. Designed by prominent local architect Nicholas T. Haller, the…

Washington Animal Rescue League Shelter and Hospital

Originating in 1914, the Washington Animal Rescue League (WARL) is historically significant for its early role in DC’s civic and humanitarian efforts to provide humane treatment for local animals. This women-organized operation began with a broad…

Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) Substation No. 25

Founded in 1891, the Potomac Electric Company merged with the Washington Railway and Electric Company to become the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) in 1902. In 1907, PEPCO established a new central generating power plant along Benning Road,…

Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) Substation No. 13

Founded in 1891, the Potomac Electric Company merged with the Washington Railway and Electric Company to become the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) in 1902. In 1907, PEPCO established a new central generating power plant along Benning Road,…

Harewood Lodge

Constructed in 1857, Harewood Lodge was the porter’s lodge for the country estate and farm of American banker, William Wilson Corcoran (1798-1888) in rural Washington County. The building served a similar function as one of the several gatehouses of…

District of Columbia Municipal Center and Plaza

This was the first building constructed according to plans developed during the 1920s for a civic center between Judiciary Square and Pennsylvania Avenue. The building was designed by municipal architect Nathan C. Wyeth and constructed with the aid…

Bloomingdale Historic District

The Bloomingdale Historic District is a group of 1,692 contributing resources bounded by Channing Street to the north; North Capital Street to the east; Florida Avenue to the south; and 2nd Street to the west. Bloomingdale is significant for its…

West Heating Plant

The West Heating Plant, originally known as the West Central Heating Plant, was designed by consulting architect William Dewey Foster (1890-1958), working under successive Supervising Architects of the Public Buildings Administration, Louis A. Simon…

Wardman Flats

The Wardman Flats are the first large-scale development project of DC's most notable developer, Harry Wardman (1872-1938). Throughout the 1890s, Wardman transitioned from carpenter to builder, largely building residential rowhouses for other…

Saint Paul's College

The Missionary Society of Saint Paul the Apostles was founded in 1858 with the purpose of converting non-Catholic Americans to Catholicism. To this end, the Paulists established their own educational curriculum to ordain priests at Saint Paul the…

Holzbeierlein Bakery

In 1895, Michael Holzbeierlein (1860-1939) opened his bakery at the rear of his house at 1849 7th Street, after having worked for several years as a foreman for the Charles Schneider Baking Company at 5th and I Streets downtown. After Holzbeierlein’s…

Union Market Historic District

Union Market Terminal is a large complex of wholesale warehouse buildings occupying an approximately forty-acre tract of land located east of Union Station between Florida and New York Avenues NE. Conceived in 1928 by a federation of wholesalers…

Southern Railway Building

Designed by Waddy B. Wood and constructed as the executive headquarters for the Southern Railway Company—one of the most successful railroad conglomerates in the early 20th century U.S.—this building is a highly visible remnant of the railroad…

Observatory Hill Historic District

Although L’Enfant anticipated that this hill overlooking the Potomac would be used for defensive battlements, it was instead set aside for a national university that never materialized. The site remained a lightly wooded military campground and…

Kelsey Temple Church of God in Christ

The years immediately after World War I were a period of intense development of neighboring residential and commercial blocks, capped by the opening of the nearby Tivoli Theatre in 1924. The influx of residents was accompanied by a wave of…

The Furies Collective

The row house at 219 11th Street SE, historically home to the Furies Collective, is a two-story, early 20th-century brick dwelling located in the Capitol Hill Historic District. Built in 1913, the house is one of a pair of dwellings in a block of…

Financial Historic District

The Financial Historic District is a linear district of monumental Beaux-Arts Classicist commercial buildings along Fifteenth Street NW, from Pennsylvania Avenue to K Street and McPherson Square. Located on an axis with the U.S. Treasury Building,…

Denrike Building

Located just north of McPherson Square in what was historically considered the northern limit of the city’s financial district, the Denrike Building is an 11-story office building designed by local architect Appleton P. Clark, Jr. The structure,…

Davidson Building

Constructed facing McPherson Square in 1917, the Davidson Building, designed by prominent local architect B. Stanley Simmons, is a representative example of a large scale private office development. In addition, the building fits within a category of…

Brookland Bowling Alleys

The Brookland Bowling Alleys was constructed in 1938-1939 for the Brookland Recreation Center, Inc. to accommodate lanes for duckpin bowling. The building’s designer was William Edward St. Cyr Barrington, an architect who learned drafting as a youth…

B.F. Saul Building

The B.F. Saul Building, constructed in 1924 at 925 15th Street NW, is a five-story, Classical Revival style building designed by notable local architect George N. Ray for the B.F. Saul Company, a major local real estate firm as a combination…

Corcoran Gallery of Art (and Interiors)

Founded in 1869 by Washington philanthropist William Wilson Corcoran, the Corcoran Gallery of Art was originally located at the corner of 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue. Rapid growth forced the gallery to relocate, and at its opening in 1897,…

Walter Reed Army Medical Center Historic District

Walter Reed General Hospital is one of the oldest operating Army general hospitals, and has played an important role in medical advancements throughout its history. Since 1924, it has been associated with medical education as the site of the Walter…

Real Estate Trust Company (Continental Trust Building)

The Real Estate Trust building stands out among DC’s early-twentieth century office buildings. The building is a steel and concrete frame structure, sheathed in ivory-colored terra cotta with poly chrome accents. Its ground floor is clad in white…

Hill Building

At the time of the Hill Building’s construction in 1925, commercial real estate development in downtown DC started replacing pre-Victorian and Victorian residential buildings. These former residences, many of which then housed private and…

Emory United Methodist Church

The Brightwood area was originally part of a rural, sparsely populated county when DC was established. Built in 1832, Emory United Methodist Church demonstrates the growth of the Brightwood community spanning over 180 years. Emory was the only…

Editors Building

The Editors Building is a ten-story office building constructed in downtown DC between 1949 and 1950 to house the offices of the family-owned and operated Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc., the publisher of various subscription-based business and…

Washington Railway and Electric Company (WRECO) Garage

The Washington Railway and Electric Company (WRECO) Garage contributed to the development of mass transit systems in the District and surrounding commercial development of the area around the intersections of Seventh Street, U Street, Georgia Avenue,…

General Baking Company Bakery (Bond Bread Factory)

The General Baking Company's Bond Bread Factory is an Art Deco-style industrial building. Constructed in 1929 to the designs of architect Corry B. Comstock, the building's style, quality craftsmanship, and decorative detailing are rare for the city's…

Chapman Coal Company Stable and Garage

The Chapman Coal Company Stable and Garage is an important surviving building in what was a bustling light industrial complex established in the early 20th century. The site evolved over the decades from a coal office and coal yard with stables at…

Wire Building

The Wire Building, constructed in 1949, is a 12-story Modern office building, distinguished both for its smooth limestone walls, which turn the corner in a sweeping curve, and its early use of continuous bands of windows. Built by real estate…

Westory Building

For much of the 1800s, the area around the future Westory was a fashionable residential neighborhood. Beginning in the 1860s, however, commercial buildings began to replace homes as the area became a financial and business center. Completed in 1907,…

Peyser Building (Security Savings and Commercial Bank)

The Peyser Building/Security Savings and Commercial Bank building is a five-story office/bank building constructed between 1928 and 1929. Designed by notable local architect George N. Ray, the Peyser Building reflects a reduced Classical Revival…

Hamilton Hotel

Designed by noted local architect Jules Henri de Sibour (1872-1938), the Beaux Arts Hamilton Hotel opened in 1922. The eleven-story limestone and terra cotta building offered out-of-town guests and locals meeting rooms, a gracious dining room, and a…

Main Sewerage Pumping Station

Though the Main Sewerage Pumping Station was constructed between 1904 and 1907, it dates back to 1889, when the President appointed a board of sanitary engineers to devise a plan for disposing of Washington's sewage. Nearly a decade later, the…

Capital Traction Company Car Barn

Also known as the Decatur Street Car Barn and the Northern Bus Garage, the Capital Traction Company Car Barn, built in 1906, is one of only seven (of the original thirty) streetcar barns in the city. Around the turn of the twentieth century, the…

Bunker Hill Elementary School

Established in 1883, Bunker Hill’s first building, a one-room brick structure, was used to educate white students before being reassigned to the city’s “colored” school division. A slightly larger structure erected in 1911 quickly proved inadequate…

Barr Building

The Barr Building was built by prominent real estate developer John L. Barr, for whom it was named, and designed by architect B. Stanley Simmons, with whom Barr often collaborated. It is executed in a soaring Gothic Revival style that is not common…

Marjorie Webster Junior College Historic District

This small intact campus was built by Marjorie Webster, a significant figure in the education of women in Washington, as a private junior college dedicated to the educational needs of working women. Throughout its fifty-one years of existence, the…

John Mercer Langston School

John Mercer Langston Elementary School was built in 1902 to handle the overflow of students from neighboring John Fox Slater School. Named for John Mercer Langston (1829-1897), the first African-American congressman from Virginia, who also had a…

John Fox Slater School

The John Fox Slater School is located in a center-city neighborhood of Washington, D.C. known as Shaw East. Completed in 1891 for African American students by the city's Office of the Building Inspector, the Queen Anne/Romanesque Revival-style…

Dorsch’s White Cross Bakery (Wonder Bread Bakery)

First established on 7th Street by Peter M. Dorsch around 1904, the White Cross Bakery grew from a small neighborhood business to one of Washington’s largest bakeries. In 1913, Dorsch built the first of several expansions in Wiltberger Alley, where…

Woodrow Wilson High School

Tenleytown's Woodrow Wilson High School exemplifies the high standard of architectural quality that characterized Washington's public school design and construction until the mid-twentieth century. The school was carefully designed to suit the unique…

Saint Paul AUMP Church

Saint Paul African Union Methodist Protestant Church is the only DC church evolved from what is considered the oldest incorporated, independent African American denomination in the country. Dating from 1813, the AUMP denomination is also noted for…

Edgar and Beronica Morris Residence

One of the elite residential landmarks of the suburban Forest Hills neighborhood, this 1939 mansion was designed by the prominent architectural firm of Porter and Lockie. It was built as the home of Edgar Morris, an appliance company owner and civic…

Third Baptist Church

Since its construction in 1893, this Gothic Revival church has been a dominating presence in its neighborhood of small two-story row houses. The first trained African American architect in DC, Calvin T.S. Brent designed various churches, but Third…

Strand Theater

When the Strand Theater opened in 1928, it was the first motion picture theater constructed east of the Anacostia River for African American patrons. For more than 40 years, the Strand was a center of community social life, reinforcing the…

George M. Barker Company Warehouse

Built in 1906 by George M. Barker Company, this warehouse accommodated the millwork and lumber firm established just after the Civil War. As DC experienced rapid population growth, construction projects proliferated across the city, and the Barker…

Danzansky Funeral Home

Bernard Danzansky, a former tailor and ice cream and stationery seller, established the first Jewish funeral parlor in DC in 1912, meeting the needs of a growing population of Jewish residents of the city. In 1923, Danzansky moved the business to…

Sixteenth Street Historic District

The Sixteenth Street Historic District is characterized by the linear experience of the street itself, one of the most important numbered streets in the Federal City, and a major element of the L'Enfant Plan. The physical aspect of Sixteenth Street,…

Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library (and Interior)

The Martin Luther King Memorial Library (MLK Library) is a four-story steel and glass International-style building in downtown DC, designed by world-famous German-born architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) and completed in 1972. The modern…

Ulysses Grant School

Foggy Bottom's historic Ulysses S. Grant School is a three-story red brick public school building constructed in 1882. The robust Victorian-era building was originally named the Analostan School, in recognition of the Native Americans who once…

M.J. Uline Ice Company and Arena (Washington Coliseum)

The M.J. Uline Ice Company, manufacturer of ice for area residents and businesses, was founded by Miguel “Mike” Uline, who had to that point been the owner of a string of ice plants in Ohio. The main block of the company’s Washington ice plant was…

Mount Vernon Triangle Historic District

The Mount Vernon Triangle Historic District consists of a tight-knit group of 25 residential, commercial, and light industrial buildings dating from 1873 to 1946. The area evolved from extremely modest pre-Civil War beginnings of scattered wood-frame…

The Bulletin Building

Erected in 1928, the Bulletin Building housed the offices and printing press of the United Publishing Company, publisher of The Bulletin. The Bulletin, founded in 1894 by Thomas C. Noyes (1868-1912), was a large, single-sheet tabloid posted at…

Anne Archbold Hall (Gallinger Hospital Nurses’ Residence)

Anne Archbold Hall was built in 1931-32 as the Nurses’ Residence of the Gallinger Municipal Hospital (later, Gallinger Memorial and ultimately D.C. General Hospital), which was a major teaching institution for the instruction of nurses.As home of the…

Saint Elizabeths: West Campus

Saint Elizabeths' West Campus includes some of the hospital's earliest buildings, with the Center Building being the first. Facilities on the West Campus of Saint Elizabeths provide a striking picture of how the opinions of mental illness and its…

Carpenters Building

Built in 1926 as the headquarters of Local No. 132 of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, this building recalls the extremely prominent role the union and its local affiliates played in the emergence of the national labor…

Seventh Street Savings Bank

Formed in 1912, the Seventh Street Savings Bank is an example of a small, independent bank—a type of financial institution that, prior to the Federal Reserve Act of 1914, specifically catered to the various DC neighborhoods; it served the financial…

Mott Motors (Plymouth Theater)

Built in 1928, the one-story commercial Mott Motors building typifies the small automobile dealerships that fostered the transformation of traditional retail streets into automobile-oriented shopping strips. Designed by the noted local firm Upman…

Benjamin Franklin School (and Interiors)

Built between 1865 and 1869, the Benjamin Franklin School was the flagship of a group of seven modern urban public school buildings constructed between 1862 and 1875 to house, for the first time, a comprehensive system of free universal public…

Chain Bridge Road School

One of only a few extant rural schools in Washington, this four-room schoolhouse, built in 1923, serves as a link and memorial to the vanished post-Civil War community of Black refugees and freedmen that grew up around the city’s Civil War…

Atlas Theater and Shops

Designed by noted theater designer John Jacob Zink in the Art Deco Style, the Atlas Theater and Shops were an iconic part of the H Street NE Corridor for 30 years. The building is identifiable through its Art Deco elements, such as zigzag…

Strong John Thomson School

Strong John Thomson School was built in 1910 by Marsh & Peter, one of the city’s most prominent architectural firms during the first two decades of the twentieth century. It highlights the firm’s significant contribution to the design of public…

United Mine Workers of America (The University Club)

Built in 1912 as the University Club, this building is now more closely associated with the legendary union leader John L. Lewis (1880-1969). A self-made man, Lewis was president of the United Mine Workers of America for more than forty years. In…

Mount Vernon Square Historic District

One of two remaining fragments of a formerly contiguous neighborhood around Mount Vernon Square, this residential and commercial enclave derives its origins from scattered growth on what was once the city’s fringe. Many of its oldest buildings are…

Daniel Webster School

Typical of DC's post-Civil War red brick schoolhouses, the Daniel Webster School shows how mass-production technology influenced the design of civic buildings in an era of great public works. It is an efficient standardized design developed by the…

On Leong Chinese Merchants Association

The Chinese Merchants Association Building is significant as the long-time home of On Leong Tong, the City’s preeminent Chinese benevolent association. In the early 1930s, when DC’s first Chinatown at Pennsylvania Avenue and Fourth Street NW was…

Chevy Chase Theater (Avalon Theater)

Built in 1922 by noted local architects Upman and Adams, the Chevy Chase Theater reflects a "high-style" example of a neighborhood movie house. The main auditorium features a stage, organ screens, and proscenium characteristic of movie theaters built…

Tower Building

The Tower Building is a twelve-story office building of steel construction and limestone veneer. Robert F. Beresford designed the building, as well as the architectural firms Bates Warren, WDG Architecture, PLLC, and Harkins Builders, Inc. Completed…

Codman Carriage House and Stable

Built in 1907, towards the end of the carriage heyday in America, this building is one of a limited number of early twentieth century private stable/carriage houses still existing in Washington. The Codman Carriage House and Stable was commissioned…

Germuiller Row

This row of three buildings represents an increasingly rare intact ensemble of Victorian-era red brick row buildings in downtown DC. The buildings are named for Julius Germuiller (1859-1929), a native Washingtonian who became one of the city's most…

Equitable Cooperative Building Association (and Interior)

The Equitable Co-Operative Building Association is a monumental scaled, one-story bank building in the Classical Revival style. Built in 1912, it is a prototypical example of a “temple front” bank building, with a facade that features four marble…

Woodward & Lothrop Service Warehouse

From the 1880s into the 20th century, the department store Woodward & Lothrop drove retailing practices and tactics in DC and beyond. This service warehouse represented another strategic shift toward improving the store’s operations and…

Embassy Gulf Service Station

The Embassy Gulf Service Station is a notable example of the 1930s gas station architecture, illustrative of efforts to produce more attractive gas stations that enhanced rather than detracted from neighboring architecture. This practice exemplified…

Elizabeth Arden Building

The Elizabeth Arden building, a six-story office building with commercial space on its first floor, is the work of Mott Schmidt, one of the leading 20th-century architects working in the Colonial Revival/Georgian Revival style. Built in 1929, the…

Hecht Company Warehouse

The Hecht Company Warehouse, with its outstanding Streamline Moderne design, embodies the machine-age aesthetics popular in the 1930s. Its extensive and innovative use of glass block made it a symbol of architectural modernism on the national level,…

Woodlawn Cemetery

Woodlawn Cemetery is situated on a gently sloping plateau and is defined by hills, winding avenues, and diverse vegetation, as well as the panoramic views it offers of the District of Columbia's metropolitan area. Douglass Avenue, the main roadway,…

Second National Bank

The Second National Bank stands among a group of banks in the vicinity of the Treasury Department that contribute to DC's financial district. It is one of the last of the classically inspired structures, built during a sustained boom in Washington…

Roosevelt Apartment Building

Built in 1898 with the appearance of a double row house that concealed the building's true identity as an apartment building, the Roosevelt Apartment Building was one example of how builders and architects introduced apartment living to…

Myrene Apartment Building

The continued growth of D.C. meant a need to house more residents, and the Myrene helped to provide middle-class Washingtonians a place to live. The resistance toward apartment living did affect its design; the architect, J.H. McIntyre, utilized a…

The Lafayette

In the final years of the 19th century, the construction of the Lafayette in 1898 marked a shift in Washingtonians' housing needs. While it only held twelve units, comparatively small to future apartment buildings, the Lafayette's conventional…

Jefferson Apartment Building

Designed by D.C. architect George S. Cooper and completed in 1899 as part of the first wave of apartment building construction, the Jefferson's conventional low-rise style utilized Romanesque Revival features for its middle-class residents working…

Hillandale (Main Residence and Gatehouse)

This expansive villa was built for Anne Archbold, one of DC's most prominent social figures during her day and the donor of much of the land that now constitutes Glover-Archbold Park. The picturesque, irregular composition of Hillandale was closely…

The Harrison (The Canterbury)

As the oldest surviving example of the first wave of purpose-built apartment buildings, the Harrison's influence on D.C. housing is quite large. While the building has a rowhouse appearance, its Romanesque Revival exterior was meant to attract…

The Gladstone and The Hawarden

Built between 1900 and 1901, these twin buildings were the first of their kind and are responsible for a major shift in how apartment buildings in the city were constructed. D.C. native George S. Cooper, who designed the two buildings in a…

Federal-American National Bank (and Interiors)

Following the merger of two banks, this building operated as headquarters for the new Federal-American National Bank. The bank was designed by architect Alfred C. Bossom (1881-1965), in association with Washington’s leading Beaux-Arts practitioner,…

Champlain Apartment Building

Built in 1905, the Champlain brought apartment living to the prestigious neighborhood surrounding K Street and McPherson Square. In order to fit into the neighborhood, the building was constructed with a marble veneer exterior, the only one of its…

The Cairo Apartment Building

Thomas Franklin Schneider returned from the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition with plenty of inspiration. The towering, state-of-the-art commercial structures Schneider had seen in Chicago were unlike anything in DC, and the grandiose architecture of…

Augusta Apartment Building

Built in 1900, the Augusta was a part of D.C.'s first wave of construction for apartment buildings, with Arthur B. Heaton as its main architect. Its mansion-like appearance allowed it to conceal its true purpose as an apartment building, and was…

Garfinckel’s Department Store (Julius Garfinckel & Co.)

Garfinckel’s Department Store, designed in 1929 by the New York architecture firm of Starrett and Van Vleck, is an excellent example of a 1920s department store. By 1928, founder Julius Garfinckel (1872-1936) was the leading clothier in Washington,…

Greyhound Bus Terminal

DC's old Greyhound Bus Terminal, built between 1939 and 1940, is a classic Art Deco landmark, whose streamlined 1930s aesthetic epitomizes the promise of the industrial age as the hope for the future and the savior of civilization. The stepped…

Western Union Building (Commercial National Bank)

The Commercial National Bank, designed by noted Washington architect Waddy B. Wood in 1917, is an excellent early example of the simplified and stylized classicism that distinguishes some of DC’s most noteworthy early-twentieth century buildings.…

Warner Theatre Building (and Interior)

This ten-story theater and office building, originally known as The Earle and now currently known as the Warner Theatre, was designed in 1924 by noted theater architect C. Howard Crane and his New York partner Kenneth Franzheim. Originally, the Earle…

McLachlen Building

The McLachlen Building is a significant work of noted and socially prominent Washington architect Jules Henri de Sibour, illustrating the influence of the McMillan Commission Plan on the business district. The building was built between 1910 and 1911…

Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company, Old Main Building

Between 1903 and 1904, the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Company constructed this new “Main” exchange building in a key downtown location to accommodate the increasing numbers of businesses beginning to rely on the telephone. Designed by…

Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company

Founded in 1883, Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Company provided telephone service to Washington, DC and eventually Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia. The construction of this building in 1928 allowed the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone…

Masonic Temple (Museum of Women in the Arts)

Designed by Wood, Donn and Deming between 1903 to 1907, the grand Masonic Temple served throughout most of the twentieth century as the headquarters of DC’s Grand Lodge, which counted many important national figures among its members. Situated on a…

Downtown Historic District

DC's old downtown area is centered along the historic commercial arteries of 7th and F Streets, which intersect at the monumental Greek Revival Old Patent Office. The Downtown Historic District offers a rich variety of commercial buildings, including…

Homer Building

The Homer Building appears to have been named for Homer Guerry, a Washington lawyer who had previously owned much of the property on which it was erected. It was opened for occupancy during World War I, which created a shortage of office space in the…

Almas Temple

The Almas Temple, built in the Moorish style by architect Allen Hussell Potts, is reminiscent of the Alhambra in Granada, Spain. The model was the castle of the Moorish kings built in the thirteenth century. The Masonic building is located in a block…

Bond Building

The Bond Building has been a pivotal structure in downtown DC’'s business and financial district since it was constructed in 1901. The seven-story Beaux Arts office building, designed by architect George S. Cooper (1864-1929), stands as a landmark to…

Tregaron (The Causeway)

The Causeway (Tregaron), a country house estate designed in 1912 by Charles Adams Platt and located within the Cleveland Park Historic District, is notable not only as the work of Platt, who was at the peak of career when he designed his only country…

Michler Place

Constructed between 1870 and 1871 by Alexander Robey "Boss" Shepherd, Michler Place was named for Lieutenant-Colonel Nathaniel Michler, a Commissioner of Public Buildings and Grounds (1867-71) and, like Shepherd, a friend of President Ulysses S.…

Ingleside (Stoddard Baptist Home)

The Stoddard Baptist Home, known historically as Ingleside, is a skillful example of the Italian Villa style of residential architectgure. Built in the early 1850s, Ingleside has had a distinguished architect and ownership history. Throughout its 135…

Schneider Triangle

In the years after the Civil War, Washington experienced a population and building boom, and as more and more people poured into the city, the need for housing increased. Development moved west and north from the center of the city and speculative…

Red Lion Row (I Street, NW, South Side of 2000 Block)

This architecturally cohesive residential row, gradually developed between 1831 and 1896, illustrates the evolution of vernacular building in DC in the nineteenth century. Its human scale and textural diversity have a major design impact on…

National Metropolitan Bank

The distinctive Beaux Arts facade of the National Metropolitan Bank Building forms a strong architectural unit with the adjacent Riggs Building, balancing Robert Mills’ east side of the Treasury Department and complementing it in scale, style, and…

Riggs Building (Keith-Albee Building)

Erected in 1912, the Riggs or Albee Building and the adjoining theater were built on a site formerly occupied by the Riggs House, a large hotel demolished in 1911. Originally, the building was known as the Riggs Building, and the adjoining theater as…

Park Road, NW, North Side of 1800 Block

The north side of the 1800 block of Park Road, NW features a distinguished group of ten large turn-of-the-century suburban residences, impressively sited on terraces above a curving cross-town artery. Together, the houses offer an exceptional display…