Home to one of the earliest judges of the DC Circuit Court, the Morsell House (John S. Williams House; Decatur-Gunther House) was built in 1813, and has been home to many of DC’s affluent and influential figures. James Sewall Morsell lived in the…

The remnants of this row of Federal style buildings date back to the 1790s. The Seven Buildings, which sit just northwest of the White House along Pennsylvania Avenue, figure extensively into the early history of, not only Washington, DC, but also…

The Six Buildings, located from 1205 to 2117 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, were an image of the early days of the Republic. Failed to be completed by James Greenleaf, the Six Buildings would be passed into the hands of Mr. Isaac Polock, who completed them…

This Federal style brick house was built for Col. Charles Beatty. Beatty owned the ferry between Georgetown and Virginia, a crucial link between the two points prior to the construction of a bridge. It was also the residence of Thomas Hyde, and his…

Built by Thomas Beall in 1784, this was the home of his son in law Col. George Corbin Washington, who was also the great nephew of George Washington. The mansion was also the home of Eliah Riggs, and in the 20th century, Katharine Graham, who was…

Built in 1865 to 1875, the cornerstone of Saint Dominic's Church was placed on November 19, 1865, just months after the conclusion of the Civil War. There had been previous iterations of the church, which included St. Mary’s “Barry Chapel,” that was…

The Northeast Savings Bank (NESB) building, located at 800 H Street NE, is indicative of both its financial use and banking history, but also retains architectural significance. It is a leading example of the Beaux-Arts style, as well as a…

Built in 1963, Little Tavern Shop No. 27 prompts nostalgia for Washingtonians through its architecture. While the shop no longer serves the public in the fast food realm, it offers a fond memory to those who visited the chain of hamburger stands.…

Providence Hospital opened just six weeks after the start of the Civil War, and was one of the longest running hospitals in the city, operating from 1861 to 1961. Opening on the corner of Second and D streets SE, the hospital’s mission of serving…